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The Wunderbar German Shepherd


August 29, 2018

Best Friend Mobility lauds the German ShepherdMost of us love them for another job they do best, caring and helping their owners in whatever way they can. These are just some of the reasons why many have grown to fall in love with the German Shepherd.

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Choosing Dog Shoes for Your Disabled Dog


May 18, 2018

Taking care of disabled dogs is a unique responsibility. The challenges both you and your dog face are much different from those of taking care of dogs with no disabilities.

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Tips on Giving Your Best Friend a Bath


April 5, 2018

 

It has to be done. Whether you or your pet dogs like it or not, they need a bath, especially if they are disabled dogs.

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Benefits of Water Therapy for Disabled Dogs


February 28, 2018

There is a new physical therapy method gaining popularity for animals recently and this is water therapy.

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Dealing with Holiday Travel Stress and Disabled Pets


October 18, 2017

The holiday season is usually also the traveling season. Many of us will travel to visit our folks for the annual reunion, or visit other family members to celebrate the yuletide season with them. Some of us will also plan family vacations during this season. For those of us who have disabled pets, we would like to bring them along since they are part of the family. However, you should prepare for some challenges.

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Weight Management for Disabled Pets


September 12, 2017

Lola suffers from a pinched nerve in her back, making it hard to exercise

Weight management for your disabled pet is very important. Weight has a major impact on your pet’s over-all health.

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Acupuncture and your disabled pet: The basics


August 31, 2017

Sticking needles into your disabled pet may cause most owners to cringe, but it hurts you more than they and may be the best therapy for many conditions.

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The Lowdown on Canine Rehab for Disabled Pets


June 14, 2017

Back in the day, you had to be a prize-winning racehorse to get the benefits of professional animal physical therapy.  That is no longer true.

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Creating a Normal Environment for Your Disabled Pet


April 12, 2017

Most people get teary-eyed and upset when they hear stories about a disabled dog or cat. However, such emotional reactions will most probably go over the head of the afflicted pet. Most animals are incapable of feeling self-pity, and cheerfully adapt and accept any changes in their circumstances. That is, unless their owners consistently treat them with pity.

Pets are quick to pick up their owner’s mood, and may start feeling anxious as a result. The best thing you can do for your disabled pet is to stop projecting your own feelings and start creating a normal environment for your pet. Disabled pets are capable of living long, happy lives if you give them half a chance.

That doesn’t mean you will not have to give them special care, however. Here are some quick tips for living with your disabled pet.

Sight impaired pets

Blindness in pets is not as devastating to them as they are for people that used to have their sight. Most people forget that dogs, particularly, rely largely on their sense of smell, so losing their sight is not all that debilitating. You may not even know they’re blind for a long time! Cats do use their sight much more, but they too can adapt to its loss if you make it easy for them to do so.

  • Reinforce their sense of security by talking to them; the sound of your voice assures them
  • Help them use and develop their sense of smell more by using attractive-smelling treats and toys to keep them alert
  • Make a point of keeping areas they frequent free of obstacles
  • Lead them around furniture and rooms to familiarize them with the layout and dimensions
  • Encourage them to socialize with other pets under controlled conditions until they are more comfortable with their sightlessness

Hearing-impaired pets

Most pets that were not born deaf have good hearing, so the loss of it does have a significant effect on their lives. You will have to make some changes to your communication and routines to cope with a loss of hearing.

  • Start practicing hand signals and touch to communicate with your pet as spoken commands will no longer work
  • Make eye contact frequently so your pet will start picking up on these non-verbal signals
  • Avoid startling your pet by approaching them with a firm step so they can feel your approach
  • Use a light to get their attention at night and keep some light available to give them a sense of security

Mobility-challenged pets

Loss of mobility presents some major challenges for both you and your pet. Mobility impairment renders your pet completely dependent on you, even if the situation is temporary. To create a normal environment order for your pet, you need to make some changes to your daily lives.

  • Get a specialist to give your pet a complete check-up and ask for long-term care recommendations
  • Keep your pet from becoming anxious by keeping to a regular schedule for daily activities
  • Give them more frequent baths if they are incontinent or cannot move quickly enough to take care of business on their own
  • Find out how to express the bowels of your pet to make life much easier for both of you
  • Make a point of regularly checking your pet for sores and wounds especially in the afflicted limbs as mobility-impaired pets can get some nasty injuries without knowing it by dragging their useless limbs around; this can lead to serious infections if not treated
  • If your budget allows it, you might try acupuncture or massage for your pet to improve mobility, especially if they are recovering from surgery
  • Continue walking your pet to give them a chance to socialize and get some outdoor time
  • Seek some support and advice from pet owners in your same situation; you just might get some great tips

Mobility aids are also a great way to create a sense of normalcy for your disabled pet. Adjustable wheelchairs, for instance, are available for all types of dogs provided they have some mobility in their front legs and otherwise healthy. Giving them the ability to get around on their own will do wonders with their well-being and physical health.

Check out these dogs in wheelchairs videos for inspiration.

Conclusion

Your disabled pet is capable of living long and happy lives despite their limitations given half a chance. While creating a normal environment for your disabled pet may requires a significant amount of time and resources at first, it will be worth it in the end.

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How to Train Your Disabled Dog to Poop on Demand


January 20, 2017

You will encounter many challenges when caring for a disabled dog, but one of the messiest is poop incontinence. Your pet does not have the ability to mobilize its forces as it may want to, so it just goes whenever it moves them. That can be upsetting for anyone, but what can you do?

Actually, you can do quite a bit, but if you are particularly squeamish, you may not like the alternative. Expressing the bowels, a.k.a. training your dog to do number two on demand by stimulating the poop reflex is not pretty, and involves the touching of the anus. However, for everyone’s health and well-being, you might have to steel yourself to do it.

Controlling when and where your disabled dog does his business can take some time, and you may have to do a bit of trial and error. However, if you succeed, it would mean no more nasty surprises in undesirable places.

Inducing the reflex

Expressing the bowel is essentially conditioning the dog’s body to evacuate it under controlled conditions, and the most convenient way to train your disabled dog to poop on demand. You will need a few things depending on the method you choose, but in any method you will need gloves. Ask your vet where to buy disposable latex gloves, the thin kind with the powder. It is hygienic because you just discard it after each use. You only need it for one hand, so a box should go a long way.

Are you ready? Here are the best techniques for inducing the poop reflex.

Technique 1:

This is the preferred technique if you have a small breed of dog, because you will be able to use the toilet to get rid of the evidence. Hold your dog securely in the crook of one arm, orienting it so that the butt is directly over the bowl and you are in a position to see what you are doing. Gently secure the tail up away from the hole so you have a clear view. Okay, now here comes the icky part.

With your gloved hand, palpate the area around the butt hole. The tissue there is usually soft, so if you don’t feel anything solid behind it, then your dog is probably not ready to go. However, if you feel a solid mass in that area, you’ve hit the jackpot. Gently press down around the solid mass until part of the fecal matter puts in an appearance. With a pincer grasp, squeeze the butt hole shut, effectively cutting a section of the poop (it can get pretty long) so it can fall off. Do the same thing again for the next section, and the next, until there’s nothing coming out anymore.

Be very careful with this technique, as pressing too hard can injure your pet. If the poop is too hard to come out easily, don’t force it. You may have to use a suppository. Consult your vet before you put anything up there.

Technique 2:

Medium and large breed dogs may be too heavy and ungainly for the potty technique, so you can try the squirt technique. Fill a squirt bottle with slightly cool (not cold) water, and test if you get stream and not spray.

When you’re ready, place your disabled pet’s butt region on some old newspapers, or lay down a couple of paper towels. Find the butt hole and squirt a bit of water directly on it. You should observe it contract when the cool water hits it. That’s the poop reflex.

Do this several times until poop starts coming out. If it is taking long, you can further stimulate it by rubbing the hole very gently with moist baby wipes. When the deed is done, simply fold over the poop-laden paper and get rid of it.

Technique 3:

You might be interested in a simpler, although not always effective technique involving ice cubes. This is very similar to the squirt method except you simply hold an ice cube on the butt hole to induce the poop reflex rather than squirt water on to it. The idea is to hold it there until the poop surrenders and comes out with its hands up. It’s not very comfortable for the dog, though, so it doesn’t always work.

Technique 4:

If none of the above techniques is proving effective for your dog, you can try one last thing. This one involves the use of a lubricant such as petroleum jelly, so you can probably guess where this is going. Rather, you know where your finger is going.

It sounds gross, yes, but you will be wearing gloves and the lubricant will ease the way, so stop whining. Do the same preparations for Techniques 2 and 3, but you won’t need any form of H20. Slather the probing finger with petroleum jelly and gently slide it in the butt. The purpose of this is to cause the butt muscles to clench, so if it does, don’t freak out. Don’t go in too far, though. A centimeter or two should do the trick. Wiggle the finger around a little and then take it out. Do this several times until the eagle lands.

Important!

You need to commit to a regular schedule and area (call it the expressing station) for training your dog to poop on demand. This gets them used to the idea, and keeps them from panicking about what you’re about to do to them with those gloves. It also conditions the body to respond appropriately, so there may come a time when you won’t need to do anything more than bring them to the right place at the right time. You can always hope.

You should try to induce the poop reflex at least twice a day, one in the morning, and one just before turning in for the night. Of course, not all pets will have the same cycle, so you may need to adjust your timing as you get to know the cycle.

Poop is a by-product of the food your pet eats, so if it smells too strong, or the texture is too hard or soft, you may have to change what you feed it. The goal is to get poop that is solid and not so smelly. Many pet owners prefer dry Bil-Jac for the ideal poop, but others think Science Diet w/d is better. Do your experiments and adjust accordingly.

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